+Add-ons

There are additional "add-on" pre- and post-conference workshops designed to augment the core conference content, facilitate networking and offer in-depth discussions on specific areas of interest.

  • Pre-conference course

    Introduction to Genomic Medicine for Practitioners

    Sunday, Oct. 5, 12:30-5 p.m. | Mayo Civic Center

    This activity has been approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s) TM. CEUs for genetic counselors and CPEs for pharmacists are pending.

    This course introduces participants to principles of genomics and pharmacogenomics using a case-based approach. Fundamental principles and issues of laboratory practice, such as DNA sequencing and interpretation, are discussed in the context of the ethics and practical considerations of the state of the science.

    This blended learning course features a pre-workshop online component to allow learners to prepare for the course and be familiar with the terms and concepts that are integrated throughout. Attendees have access to a complete set of introductory material covering fundamental vocabulary and foundational principles and are encouraged to complete this introductory material prior to the conference.

    Introduction to Genomic Medicine for Practitioners is an interactive course led by educators and health care experts who are at the forefront of personalized medicine. It provides a foundation for participants to grow their expertise in the emerging field of genomic medicine.

    Register Now

    $125 Non-Mayo participants
    $100 Mayo staff

    Purchase DVD and syllabus of Omics 101: A Primer for Clinical Practice — the pre-conference course from the 2013 Individualizing Medicine conference. CME credit available following successful completion of online assessment modules.

    Who should attend

    This course walks health care team members through medical genomics applications and is designed for physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, genetic counselors, pharmacists, laboratory professionals, medical students, residents and fellows.

    Course objectives

    At the end of this session, attendees will be able to:

    1. Explain uses of medical genomics information in clinical practice
    2. Discuss the use of "omics" technology in advancing patient care for diagnostic dilemmas, cancer therapy and drug therapy
    3. Discuss ethical, legal and social issues (ELSI) for patients with diagnostic dilemmas, cancer patients and drug-gene pair applications
    4. Identify patients who may benefit from referral for consideration of genomic analysis
    5. Differentiate the risks and benefits for individualized medicine in patient care
  • Post-conference workshop

    Epigenomics to Practice

    Wednesday, Oct. 8, Mayo Clinic | 12:30-5:30 p.m.

    This workshop provides an overview of Mayo Clinic efforts to translate concepts and methodologies from the field of epigenomics to medical practice.

    Emphasis is on presenting and discussing new discoveries in the areas of disease mechanisms, diagnostic and prognostic markers, and recent advances in the area of epigenetic pharmacology. Participants gain insights into how the rapidly emerging field of epigenomics is being applied to modern medicine.

    Register Now

    Free!

    Why attend

    Though aberrant activation or inactivation of genes caused by mutations and deletions can have deleterious effects on organisms, this mechanism does not explain the majority of human diseases. In addition, genetic alterations are difficult to repair for therapeutic purposes.

    Epigenetics, a rapidly emerging scientific discipline, seeks to define how individual genes are turned on and off independently of their mutational status to produce distinct normal and diseased phenotypes. Epigenomics, the genome-wide application of epigenetic techniques, is extending the power of genomics, proteomics and other high-throughput techniques for the analysis of complex disease phenotypes.

    In addition, emerging data demonstrate that, contrary to genetic alterations, epigenetic changes are amenable to therapeutic intervention. Epigenomic markers are beginning to be used for diagnostic purposes in single individuals or in populations. Thus, concepts and methodologies from the field of epigenomics are becoming part of the arsenal of tools available to practitioners to study, prevent and manage common human diseases.

    The goal of this workshop is to educate the medical field at large on the application of this discipline to diagnose, manage, prevent and cure human diseases.

    Who should attend

    The format and content of this workshop seeks to inform the medical community at large, including practitioners, allied health personnel, students, and basic and clinical investigators, as well as ethicists and policymakers.

    Workshop goals

    The Epigenomics to Practice workshop includes lectures by Mayo Clinic investigators and guest speakers as well as poster sessions in an atmosphere that emphasizes participation and discussions.

    At the end of the workshop, participants are expected to have gained an understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying epigenetic events; provide descriptions of tools for the design and execution of research in this discipline; discuss how to generate and analyze data; and more importantly, discuss the application of epigenomics to disease prevention, diagnostics and therapeutics.

    Keynote speaker

    • Peter A. Jones, Ph.D., D.Sc. Van Andel Research Institute

    Speakers

    • Yali Dou, Ph.D. University of Michigan
    • Peggy Farnham, Ph.D. University of Southern California
    • Tamas Ordog, M.D. Mayo Clinic
    • Zhiguo Zhang, Ph.D. Mayo Clinic
  • Post-conference workshop

    Biomarker Discovery at Mayo Clinic

    Wednesday, Oct. 8, Mayo Clinic | 12:30-5:30 p.m.

    This workshop provides an overview of Mayo Clinic efforts to clinically validate newly discovered biomarkers and translate them into clinical practice.

    A biomarker provides key molecular or cellular events that predict a health outcome or better stratify a patient to a clinical treatment. The Mayo Clinic Biomarker Discovery Program is integrated with the clinical practice to identify biomarkers that address relevant clinical questions and improve patient care.

    The Biomarker Discovery Program combines the multidisciplinary expertise of pathologists, surgeons, oncologists, molecular biologists, and bioinformaticians and biostatisticians to establish expert project teams that ensure careful design and execution of studies to derive robust clinical biomarkers.

    Once a biomarker is identified, the program collaborates closely with clinical labs in the Mayo Clinic Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology to clinically validate and translate the marker(s) into clinical practice.

    This workshop provides insights into how biomarkers are discovered, evaluated and translated into modern medical practice. Through presentations from experts in the field and open panel discussions, an emphasis is made on highlighting the major challenges associated with the validation and translation of biomarkers into clinical practice.

    Register Now

    Free!

    Why attend

    Attendees learn about the latest advances in biomarker discovery at Mayo Clinic. The open discussion forum provides attendees with unique insight into how a biomarker progresses through the process of validation and translation and enables interactions with experts in the field.

    By attending this workshop, participants become familiar with the current processes of biomarker discovery and translation. In return, the attendee has the opportunity to provide feedback on his or her own experiences in biomarker translation and the effectiveness of our strategies to ultimately meet patients' clinical needs.

    Who should attend

    The format of this workshop aims to appeal to all levels of the medical community, including clinicians, allied health personnel, research scientists, students, ethicists and policymakers, to actively participate in our discussions on biomarker discovery.

    Workshop goals

    The workshop covers the steps involved in the process of implementing a biomarker test into the clinic. Attendees learn about issues with and solutions for the process of developing a robust, clinically relevant test and get insights into navigating the complex regulatory approval process. All attendees are encouraged to get involved and participate in the open discussion forums.

    Moderators

    • George Vasmatzis, Ph.D. Co-Director, Biomarker Discovery ProgramMayo Clinic
    • John C. Cheville, M.D. Co-Director, Biomarker Discovery ProgramMayo Clinic

    Speakers

    • Michael T. Barrett, Ph.D. Mayo Clinic
    • Rashid Bashir, Ph.D. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    • Mitesh J. Borad, M.D. Mayo Clinic
    • Benjamin R. Kipp, Ph.D. Mayo Clinic
    • Minetta C. Liu, M.D. Mayo Clinic
    • Kiaran P. McGee, Ph.D. Mayo Clinic
  • Post-conference workshop

    Microbiome and Pharmacogenomics - Bugs and Drugs

    Wednesday, Oct. 8, Mayo Clinic | 12:30-5:30 p.m.

    The gut microbiome, composed of aggregate genomes of the trillions of microorganisms present in the human gut, plays a vital role for human health by extending our own metabolism through transforming our diet as well as modifying host-targeted drugs. The gut microbiome also serves as a rich source of natural compounds with significant potential to affect human health.

    Join us for a half-day workshop as we explore this exciting interface between the microbiome and health.

    Register Now

    Free!

    Why attend

    Attendees obtain state-of-the-art information regarding the relevance of the microbiome in human health. Emphasis is placed on chemical biotransformation by gut microbes and their relevance to current therapies, natural compounds made by gut microbes and their relevance to human health, and the importance of understanding microbial metabolism.

    Who should attend

    • Health care providers, including physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurses and dietitians, interested in opportunities for promoting health and wellness through knowledge of the relationship between the microbiome and human health
    • Clinical investigators with an interest in testing novel microbiota-derived and microbiota-directed therapies, nutritional interventions and employing microbial metabolism to prevent drug side effects of medications
    • Scientists in the fields of oncology, pharmacology, microbiology and immunology, biochemistry and molecular biology, and systems biology and bioinformatics with an interest in developing clinical tools from microbiome research

    Workshop goals

    • Integrate microbiome knowledge with the medical practice to promote healthy living and offer new therapies for medical conditions

    Specific goals include:

    • Understand chemical biotransformation of drugs by gut microbiota and potential causes for drug resistance
    • Microbiota-derived products with potential therapeutic potential
    • Therapeutic approaches using the microbiome, including genetically engineered bacteria
    • Computational approaches to understanding microbial metabolism

    Moderator

    • Purna C. Kashyap, MBBS Mayo Clinic

    Speakers

    • Emily Balskus, Ph.D. Harvard University
    • Nicholas Chia, Ph.D. Mayo Clinic
    • Michael Fischbach, Ph.D. University of California San Francisco School of Medicine
    • Chris Henry Argonne National Laboratory
    • Purna C. Kashyap, MBBS Mayo Clinic
    • Heidi Nelson, M.D. Mayo Clinic
    • Matthew Redinbo, Ph.D. University of North Carolina School of Medicine
    • Richard Weinshilboum, M.D. Mayo Clinic
  • Post-conference workshop

    The Application of Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomics

    Wednesday, Oct. 8, Mayo Clinic | 12:30-5:30 p.m.

    This session discusses the application of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics for biomarker discovery in diseases, exploratory studies to gain mechanistic insights, and elucidation of metabolic signatures of different physiological conditions.

    The goal of this workshop is to provide a comprehensive view of the opportunities and challenges of metabolomics in research, including theoretical and practical considerations and examples of successful applications of metabolomics in research.

    Register Now

    Free!

    Why attend

    Metabolomics is the systematic study of the unique chemical fingerprints that specific cellular processes leave behind. Mayo Clinic is a leader in this emerging field and has recently become one of six federally funded regional comprehensive metabolomics resource cores.

    This workshop is designed to highlight the potential opportunities of metabolomics for biomarker discovery and other types of basic and translational research. Attendees also gain knowledge of the practical considerations necessary for successful implementation of metabolomics in their own research. This is an ideal opportunity for researchers to network with colleagues and experts in the field and learn about new techniques.

    Find out more about metabolomics at Mayo Clinic.

    Who should attend

    Basic science investigators, clinical and translational science investigators, KL2 scholars, other K-award recipients, and trainees who are new to the metabolomics field and wish to explore the opportunity to use metabolomics in their research.

    Workshop goals

    • Provide education on emerging metabolomics methodologies and application to basic and translational research through presentations by faculty from Mayo Clinic and the University of Michigan
    • Discuss opportunities and services offered through the Mayo Clinic Metabolomics Resource Core
    • Discuss principles and practice of applying metabolomics tools for clinical research and biomarker discovery
    • Review examples of successful applications of metabolomics methods

    Keynote speaker

    • Charles Burant, M.D., Ph.D. University of Michigan

    Speakers

    • K. Sreekumaran Nair, M.D., Ph.D. Mayo Clinic
    • Adrian Vella, M.D. Mayo Clinic
    • Ian R. Lanza, Ph.D. Mayo Clinic
    • Surendra Dasari, Ph.D. Mayo Clinic
  • Post-conference workshop

    Representation of Genetic Test Results

    Wednesday, Oct. 8, Mayo Clinic | 12:30-5:30 p.m.

    Genetic data cannot be used to improve health if it cannot be accurately communicated and correctly understood. Currently, the tremendous variability in the representation of genetic test results forms a barrier to the efficient exchange and use of this information by clinicians and researchers.

    This workshop utilizes clinical use cases to explore current methods for reporting genetic test results, the challenges that variability in those methods present for the exchange and use of genetic data, and the impact that this variability has on patient care and translational research. Presentations from experts in the field are used to guide open discussion of these issues and possible solutions that go beyond syntactic transformations.

    Register Now

    Free!

    View the workshop agenda, which contains links to the slides in PDF format.

    Why attend

    You should attend if you are impacted by how genomic data are represented, including those who use genomic data in patient care, develop software for the analysis and interpretation of clinical genomic data, or implement clinical decision-support rules.

    Attendees learn about how different types of genomic data are currently represented, as well as gain insight into the cultural and technical drivers behind competing nomenclature and identification schemes. Attendees also learn about how genomic data are stored within electronic medical records and how limitations in the design of clinical information systems can impact how genomic data can be used.

    This workshop is an ideal opportunity for participants to engage experts in focused discussion about alternative ways to represent genomic data. It is an open forum in which presentations will drive active participation.

    Who should attend

    • Informaticians and information technology professionals who store, annotate or retrieve genomic data from clinical information systems, or who design tools related to these activities
    • Clinical or translational investigators who utilize genomic data obtained from electronic medical records in their research
    • Researchers who generate or use genomic data from clinical biospecimens, regardless of where the data are stored
    • Health care providers, including laboratory personnel and genetic counselors, who generate or use genomic test results

    Workshop goals

    The goal of this workshop is to bring together representatives from multiple disciplines who create, implement or use genomic results in the electronic medical record for patient care and research.

    Participants will:

    • Discuss examples of clinical genomic test results that illustrate differences in data representation
    • Learn how variability in the representation of genomic data impacts its use for both patient care and research
    • Discuss the strengths and limitations of existing methods for representing genomic test results
    • Identify challenges of representing genomic test results, including disparate standards, conventions and technical requirements
    • Explore opportunities for improving how genomic data are represented

    Speakers

    • Robert R. Freimuth, Ph.D. Mayo Clinic
    • John Logan Black, M.D. Mayo Clinic
    • Linnea M. Baudhuin, Ph.D. Mayo Clinic
    • Pedro J. Caraballo, M.D. Mayo Clinic
    • Jason L. Ross Mayo Clinic
    • Donna Maglott, Ph.D. National Institutes of Health